February 15, 2006

walk in someone’s shoes

Posted in Idioms at 10:34 am by Feng

walk in someone’s shoesthink see things from other people’s perspective

I had been using an old-fashioned CRT monitor since two years ago when I first started my PhD study. But it made me feel uncomfortable in my eyes my eyes feel uncomfortable. Finally I couldn’t stand it anymore, and asked for an LCD replacement. However, the person in charge of this wasn’t willing to give me one. He required me to “prove” that I did feel uncomfortable with the old monitor. What requirement what kind of requirement is that? It reminds me of a Chinese saying, literally translated into this: “Only people themselves know whether they are comfortable with their shoes”. I wonder is there if there is an equivalent English one a similar saying in English that I can use to refute this unreasonable requirement. A friend suggested, “You can reply: walk in my shoes, and you will know”.

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9 Comments »

  1. Feng said,

    The good news is that finally I got one; it made my day.

  2. Check out these lyrics from the 1960s pop song “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” by Joe South (also covered by Elvis Presley and Tina Turner).

    If I could be you, if you could be me
    For just one hour, if we could find a way
    To get inside each other’s mind
    If you could see you through my eyes
    Instead your own ego I believe you’d be
    I believe you’d be surprised to see
    That you’ve been blind

    Walk a mile in my shoes
    just walk a mile in my shoes
    Before you abuse, criticize and accuse
    Then walk a mile in my shoes

  3. Feng said,

    Great lyrics.

  4. Saar Drimer said,

    change:

    “think from other people’s perspective” to “see things from…”

    “But it made me feel uncomfortable in my eyes” to “Unfortunately, it makes my eyes hurt/feel unmfortable.”

    “saying, literally translated into this” to “…saying that literally translates to…”

    “What requirement is that?” to “What kind of…”

    “is” for “if”

  5. Feng said,

    I guess one typical mistake I made and many other Chinese would also make is “I feel uncomfortable in my eyes.” But the correct expression should be “My eyes feel uncomfortable”. Though this seems a bit strange (how can “eyes” feel, not “the person”), it is commonly used.

  6. Mark said,

    change:

    “It reminds me a Chinese saying, …” to “It reminds me of a Chinese saying, …”

  7. Feng said,

    You are right. I had lived with this mistake for a long time. Thanks for correcting me.

  8. david said,

    “did feel ” ->> “felt”
    equivalent English one -> English equivalent (strike the “one”) …for readability
    “I wonder is there if there is a similar saying in English ”
    or
    I wonder is there if there is an English equivalent that I could use…”
    just seems easier to read that way 😉

  9. Feng said,

    I agree with your comments, except that I think “did feel” is OK if you want to emphasize something.


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